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No More Enchiladas
Teacher thankful for experience.

Moving Music
Six community concerts planned

Wheels & Gears
A new exhibit features transportation

Spaceport America
Visitor center opens

Hiking Apacheria
Spirits, Turtles... and Dorothy

MainStreet Anniversary
30 and counting

Museum Talk
A busy summer of eclecitc exhibits

Predator Alert
What to do if you encounter a bear

ETC...

15 Fires
2 Keys
Christmas in July
Women in Agriculture Award
Governor's Awards
New Gila Leader


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Genderbread: Redefining Cultural Norms


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WILDFIRE

Tale of 15 Fires



Forest personnel manage incidents to advantage Fifteen fires were reported in southwestern New Mexico wilderness areas in the middle of the month of June.

Lightning struck and kicked off the two biggest fires, both on June 16.

As of June 27, rains had reduced the spread of both fires and management teams were pulling back.

The 3,305-acre Pinon Fire was located 13 miles east of Reserve on the Reserve Ranger District. And the 3,670-acre Moore Fire was in the Gila Wilderness on the Wilderness Ranger District.

The lightning-caused wildfires have been used to help thin the forest, remove hazardous fuels and improve wildlife habitat.

Several additional wildfires were detected on the forest after thunderstorms and lightning passed over the region several times in June. These were generally single trees struck by lightning. Firefighters contained two of the fires and at least three others were placed in monitor status.

The Woodrow Fire in the Gila Wilderness near the Mogollon Baldy Lookout was contained June 19 at 360 acres.

As of press time all campgrounds are open on the Wilderness and Reserve Ranger Districts and are first-come, first serve.

Be alert that flash flooding is possible any time heavy rainfall occurs. Gila National Forest officials would like to remind travelers to drive with caution on roads near the Pinon and Moore fires as equipment and personnel are still present.

 





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