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The green-building revolution promises to save money and the planet.

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Heart of Glass
A man, a plan, a wall--and several tons of wine bottles.

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The "adult-entertainment" business is becoming mainstream.

High Desert Reggae
Root Skankadelic dishes funk and peace to the masses.

Searching for Ulzana
The daring Apache who inspired the film Ulzana's Raid left his mark on SW New Mexico.

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Features

Building Lightly
on the Earth

The green-building revolution promises to save money and the planet.

Paper Work
An inventor turns waste paper into an earth-friendly building material.

Do-Overs
Re-using old building materials and furnishings.

Heart of Glass
A man, a plan, a wall--and several tons of wine bottles.

Sex Sells
The "adult-entertainment" business is becoming mainstream.

High Desert Reggae
Root Skankadelic dishes funk and peace to the masses.

Searching for Ulzana
The daring Apache who inspired the film Ulzana's Raid left his mark on SW New Mexico.

Rodeo Roundup
Meet a "rodeo mom," a champion rider-turned-breeder and a future star.

The Art of Teaching
At Alma d'arte Charter High School, art saves lives.


Columns & Departments
Editor's Note
Letters
Desert Diary

Tumbleweeds:
Having a Ball with Billy
Author on Fire
Tumbleweeds Briefs
Top 10


Borderlines
Business Exposure
Into the Future
Celestial Cycles
Kitchen Gardener
The Starry Dome
Ramblin' Outdoors
People's Law
40 Days & 40 Nights
Millie & Billy Ball
Clubs Guide
Guides to Go
Henry Lightcap's Journal
Continental Divide


Special Section
Arts Exposure
Marilyn Gendron
Arts News
Gallery Guide

Body, Mind & Spirit
Tools for Living
Ways to Heal

Red or Green?
Dining Guide

HOME
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Water, Blessed Water

Getting to know H20—what does it say to you?

 

It's hot and dry today, again. Dry and hot. Summer is settling in. They say this is the driest spring they've seen in Grant County for several decades. Any available moisture is sucked from the air before it hits the ground

Seems like a good time to reflect on our relationship with water. Imagine what life would be like without it. Well, there wouldn't be any life, for starters.

We are beings composed primarily (70-plus percent) of water. We are containers filled to the brim with it. Water flows in our very cells. It's the ultimate delivery system—interconnecting every other bodily system.

Water binds all who inhabit life on this incredible blue-green planet (also composed of, hmm, 70-plus percent water). Water interconnects every inhabitant, ensuring our interdependence: animals, plants, the earth and stones too. Our watery source seals the promise that we are all One.

But we forgot that fact long ago. We lost the ability to know and feel we are all One entity.

It's obvious that Mother Nature has decided to remind us by intensifying our relationship with our environment. Extreme weather patterns force our attention.

Here in the Land of Enchantment, a deepening drought brings acute awareness of the critical balancing act water plays in our ecosystem. In our area, the Gila River is one of the world's largest desert rivers, and the last main stream river in New Mexico. Our lives are deeply intertwined with this river system whether we realize it or not. There are plans afoot for diverting it, managing it, allocating it or otherwise intervening in its natural flow. Could be a disaster in the making.

Regardless of what you think of "peak oil" (see the December 2005 Desert Exposure) and where we are in terms of global consumption of fuel (oil and water!), investigation, planning and action are essential if we hope to maintain any of our hard-won freedoms. . . into the future. The war between unbridled development and long-term sustainability is waging and one of the biggest battles is use of water resources.

"Be prepared" was never a bad motto.

Thank God for community groups that keep an eye on government and corporate interests—investigating behind-the-scenes machinations, experimenting and implementing alternatives, planning contingencies and acting in unison to create workable resources, with a particular eye on the current state of the world. Groups such as:

have all the information you need to become knowledgeable about the state of water and sustainable living in this multi-layered biosphere of Southwest New Mexico.

 

The impact of water on our lives is as deep internally as externally. Have you seen Dr. Masaru Emoto's work on the molecular structure of water? His book, The Hidden Messages in Water, offers proof that water is alive and responsive to our every emotion. Our thoughts, vibrations and projections affect its structure. His amazing photographs (at 200-500 magnification) of ice crystals reveal an infinite variety of form and structure. The proof is in the pictures.

Another scientist, Dr. Fereydoon Batmanghelidj, author of Water for Health, For Healing, For Life (www.watercure.com) tested "water as medicine" in over 3,000 cases. He concluded that a water shortage in the body (dehydration) always manifests as pain. He posits that the body's drought-management programs include allergies, hypertension, diabetes and some immune diseases. He is continuing his work to prove that water can heal pain, as much as the AMA and the pharmaceutical industry do not want it to be this simple.

The medical status quo is fighting tooth and nail studies that aim to prove:

Is water waiting for us to tune in to it? Can water give us answers we'd never considered?

For too long we have left to others to come up with answers (our churches and governments, for example). The paradigm of the next 2,000 years is different—it's up to YOU to find your own answers. It's up to you to do whatever it is you wish someone else would do for you.

In light of this discussion, it's up to you to develop a personal, conscious relationship with your environment. The Ecological Footprint questionnaire at: www.earthday.net/Footprint is a fun place to start.

I'm taking Dr. Emoto's work to heart and developing an interactive relationship with the water in my life. I'm building an emotional bond with the water I drink, splash on my face, and share a shower with. I talk to it. Smile at it. Imagine its caress as a lover's.

I focus on it lovingly, with a reverent attitude toward its sacredness. I wish water joy as it travels, thank it for any healing it can bring to my body, and surround it with peace. I pray to water and know I'm talking to God.

It's a fun, easy communication that I encourage people to try. Bless the water you drink. Sing songs while watering your garden. Discuss your life with it while relaxing in the tub. See what it says to you.

Also, when you see the clouds, with your intent, imagine the water through the atmosphere to the earth and stones. It can't hurt.

Given the times we are immersed in, it can't hurt to try new things, open the doors of perception a tad and let the realities of the universe come for a visit.

My assumption here is that neither corporations, government, legislation, nor any person pushing a political line is going to do squat for our future water needs except to protect their own interests. So I encourage each person and family to look at their water needs. To examine how they use water. To develop a sacred and mutually conscious relationship with water, especially if you live in an area currently in a drought phase.

 

Into the Future columnist Siri Dharma lives in Grant County and loves it.

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